Self Defense

In Wisconsin, the Criminal Code provides that a person has the right, or the privilege, to use force against another person in order to prevent or terminate what s/he reasonably believes to be an unlawful interference with his/her person.  But, that force must be limited to the amount of force s/he believes is reasonably necessary to prevent or terminate that unlawful interference.  Deadly force is not legally acceptable unless s/he reasonably believes that such deadly force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself.

Wisconsin law requires that juries find the Defendant Not Guilty of either First or Second Degree Intentional Homicide if the jury finds that the Defendant reasonably believed that s/he was preventing or terminating an unlawful interference with his/her person and reasonably believed that the force used was necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself/herself.  This is the definition of Self-Defense.  Clearly, the main issue here is whether the jury finds that the Defendant “Reasonably” believed that deadly force was necessary.  This is a key factor for an experienced Wisconsin Criminal Defense Attorney to develop.

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